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  • Fact Sheet

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the nation’s first line of defense against hunger, is critically important for rural America. In addition to improving the food security, health, and well-being of participating families, federal SNAP dollars stimulate rural economies through assistance that goes directly to struggling families to purchase food.

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  • Fact Sheet

    No community in America is immune to hunger, including rural areas. Paradoxically, in rural areas that grow most of our nation’s food, households face considerably deeper struggles with hunger than those in metropolitan areas. Millions of working families, veterans, people with disabilities, seniors, and children in rural communities cannot always afford and access enough food for an active, healthy life.

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  • Fact Sheet

    Key actions representing the latest best practices to start or enhance efforts to address food insecurity in health care settings. A joint publication of FRAC, Children’s HealthWatch and Feeding America.

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  • Infographic

    An infographic stating early 1.1 million low-income children benefited from afterschool suppers in October 2016. From FRAC’s first-ever report on participation data in the Afterschool Nutrition Programs.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The School Breakfast Program plays a vital role in supporting children’s health and academic achievement. Still, too many students miss out on school breakfast and the positive outcomes that stem from participation. Just over half of low-income children who participate in school lunch also participate in school breakfast. School nurses can help increase student nutritional intake through school breakfast participation by encouraging their school(s) to implement a breakfast after the bell program and to offer nutritious breakfasts at no cost to all students, particularly in schools or school districts with high concentrations of students certified for free and reduced-price school meals.

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  • Report

    FRAC’s first-ever report on the Afterschool Nutrition Programs measures how many children had access to afterschool suppers and snacks in October 2016, nationally and in each state.

    The report found that nearly 1.1 million low-income children benefited from afterschool suppers in October 2016, up from just 200,000 in October 2011.

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  • Interactive Data Tool

    State of the States: Profiles of Hunger, Poverty, and Federal Nutrition Programs

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  • Interactive Data Tool

    Data profiles are available for every state and for the nation as a whole, and are designed to help states measure how they are faring in using key public nutrition programs to reduce hunger and improve the health and economic security of low-income families.

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  • Report

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is one of the crown jewels of U.S. public policy. More than 40 million children, parents working at low wages, seniors, people with disabilities, veterans, members of the active duty military, unemployed working-age adults, and others receive SNAP in an average month.

    This report outlines the numerous benefits of SNAP, how attacks on the program are directed at much of America’s population, why the proposals to restrict SNAP foods are misplaced, and policy solutions that exist to improve SNAP beneficiaries’ health.

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  • Report

    This report reviews existing and emerging opportunities to document food insecurity screening, assessment, intervention, and billing for each part of a patient visit using discrete codes and language from standardized EHR medical vocabularies.

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  • Report

    The North Carolina School Breakfast Report examines key findings regarding school breakfast participation rates in North Carolina school districts that participated in the School Breakfast Program and the National School Lunch Program during the 2016–2017 school year. In addition, this report informs about the School Breakfast Program’s benefits and how it works; explains how to offer breakfast at no charge to all students, potentially through community eligibility; describes breakfast after the bell models; highlights top-performing school districts; and provides school breakfast funding information.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The School Breakfast Program plays a vital role in supporting children’s health and academic achievement. Still, too many students miss out on school breakfast and the positive outcomes that stem from participation. School social workers can help increase school breakfast participation by encouraging schools in their district to implement a breakfast after the bell program and to offer breakfast for free to all students (particularly in schools or school districts with high concentrations of students certified for free and reduced-price school meals).

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  • Report

    This annual analysis shows CACFP participation data for child care centers and family child care homes for the U.S. and for each state and the District of Columbia. This report highlights key findings of the data for fiscal year 2017.

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  • Fact Sheet

    Give policymakers a brief, up-to-date fact sheet on what they can do to protect and strengthen key anti-hunger programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

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  • Interactive Data Tool

    This interactive map provides state-by-state data on participation in the free and reduced-price School Breakfast Program, as compared to participation in the free and reduced-price National School Lunch Program. These data are based on FRAC’s analysis of data shared with FRAC by USDA and state nutrition and education agencies, and are featured in FRAC’s reports, School Breakfast Scorecard: School Year 2016-2017, and School Breakfast: Making it Work in Large School Districts.

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