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  • Report

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is one of the crown jewels of U.S. public policy. More than 40 million children, parents working at low wages, seniors, people with disabilities, veterans, members of the active duty military, unemployed working-age adults, and others receive SNAP in an average month.

    This report outlines the numerous benefits of SNAP, how attacks on the program are directed at much of America’s population, why the proposals to restrict SNAP foods are misplaced, and policy solutions that exist to improve SNAP beneficiaries’ health.

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  • Report

    This report reviews existing and emerging opportunities to document food insecurity screening, assessment, intervention, and billing for each part of a patient visit using discrete codes and language from standardized EHR medical vocabularies.

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  • Report

    The North Carolina School Breakfast Report examines key findings regarding school breakfast participation rates in North Carolina school districts that participated in the School Breakfast Program and the National School Lunch Program during the 2016–2017 school year. In addition, this report informs about the School Breakfast Program’s benefits and how it works; explains how to offer breakfast at no charge to all students, potentially through community eligibility; describes breakfast after the bell models; highlights top-performing school districts; and provides school breakfast funding information.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The School Breakfast Program plays a vital role in supporting children’s health and academic achievement. Still, too many students miss out on school breakfast and the positive outcomes that stem from participation. School social workers can help increase school breakfast participation by encouraging schools in their district to implement a breakfast after the bell program and to offer breakfast for free to all students (particularly in schools or school districts with high concentrations of students certified for free and reduced-price school meals).

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  • Report

    This annual analysis shows CACFP participation data for child care centers and family child care homes for the U.S. and for each state and the District of Columbia. This report highlights key findings of the data for fiscal year 2017.

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  • Fact Sheet

    Give policymakers a brief, up-to-date fact sheet on what they can do to protect and strengthen key anti-hunger programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

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  • Interactive Data Tool

    This interactive map provides state-by-state data on participation in the free and reduced-price School Breakfast Program, as compared to participation in the free and reduced-price National School Lunch Program. These data are based on FRAC’s analysis of data shared with FRAC by USDA and state nutrition and education agencies, and are featured in FRAC’s reports, School Breakfast Scorecard: School Year 2016-2017, and School Breakfast: Making it Work in Large School Districts.

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  • Report

    This annual analysis looks at school breakfast participation and policies in 75 large school districts across the country to evaluate successful practices in reaching more low-income children with school breakfast. It is a companion report to the School Breakfast Scorecard.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The president’s fiscal year 2019 budget does not propose any direct changes to the federally funded Afterschool Meal and Snack Programs. These child nutrition programs, like the National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs and the Summer Nutrition Programs, are federal entitlement programs and are not part of the president’s proposal for the discretionary budget. The proposed budget does, however, zero out funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC), the largest federal funding source for operations of afterschool and summer programs.

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  • Report

    This annual report analyzes participation in the School Breakfast Program among low-income children nationally and in each state and the District of Columbia for the 2016-2017 school year. The report also features best practices for increasing participation in the program, including breakfast after the bell models and community eligibility.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is an important source of nutritious foods and nutrition education for many pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children up to age five in low-income families. The program provides a monthly package of WIC checks that can be used in the grocery store to buy specific healthy foods. NOTE: This document was published in 2009 and is part of the Resource Library for its citation in this recently updated resource: Impact of the Revised WIC Food Packages on Nutrition Outcomes and the Retail Food Environment.

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  • Infographic

    “Congress should strengthen SNAP by passing the ‘Closing the Meal Gap Act’ (HR 1276)” infographic.

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  • Fact Sheet

    This brief highlights research on the connections between food insecurity and behavior, and the critical role that the Federal Nutrition Programs play when addressing these issues among school-age children and adolescents.

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  • Toolkit

    Check out FRAC’s #SNAPshots campaign graphics to spread awareness of how SNAP lifts up millions of U.S. households.

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  • Graphic

    A quote from FRAC’s #SNAPshots campaign, shedding light on the importance of SNAP and federal nutrition programs.

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