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  • Fact Sheet

    Every day, school nutrition departments across the country provide healthy meals to children to fuel their minds and bodies. FRAC has a variety of resources to help school districts boost participation in school breakfast and lunch and implement strong afterschool and summer nutrition programs that maximize federal child nutrition funding.

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  • Advocacy Tool

    FRAC’s resources for advocacy efforts supporting SNAP in the Farm Bill.

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  • Interactive Data Tool

    These interactive maps provide state-by-state data on participation in breakfast and lunch service through the Summer Nutrition Programs.

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  • Infographic

    “The most successful summer meals sites offer educational and recreational activities that keep children engaged all summer long.”

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  • Infographic

    Too many low-income children lack access to summer meal sites where they can eat, learn, and play.

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  • Infographic

    “Serve breakfast instead of morning snack. Serve breakfast later in morning. Provide breakfast on weekends. Promote breakfast participation among sites.”

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  • Infographic

    Many low-income children experience the “summer slide” — the loss of academic skills and knowledge over the summer. Enriching summer sites can help close the gap.

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  • Report

    This report measures the reach of the Summer Nutrition Programs in July 2017, nationally and in each state. A companion piece, FRAC’s Hunger Doesn’t Take a Vacation: Summer Breakfast Status Report, focuses on summer breakfast participation.

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  • Report

    This report measures the reach of breakfast through the Summer Nutrition Programs in July 2017, nationally and in each state. It is a companion piece to FRAC’s Hunger Doesn’t Take a Vacation: Summer Nutrition Status Report, which focuses on summer lunch participation.

    Read the report
  • Best Practice

    School meals programs provide children with the opportunity to receive the nutrition they need throughout the school day. Many households participate in school meals programs to ensure that their children are fed when they are away from home. There are various instances, however, when a household that is not certified for free or reduced-price school meals may not be able to pay for school meals. Reasons for the lack of money on the school lunch account can vary from a change in household income status, a misunderstanding of school meal procedures, or simply forgetting to refill the account. When this occurs, school districts should ensure that communication about the debt is held with the households and not the students. There are several effective strategies for outreach and engagement with households that have school meal debt.

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  • Fact Sheet

    This fact sheet, from the National Women’s Law Center and the Food Research & Action Center, describes how SNAP helps lift and keep low-income women and families out of poverty, and highlights how proposed changes to SNAP in the 2018 House Farm Bill would harm women and families.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The Afterschool Nutrition Programs fill the hunger gap that exists after school for millions of low-income children in rural communities. The programs, which include the Child and Adult Care Afterschool Meal Program and the National School Lunch Program Afterschool Snack Program, provide federal funding to afterschool programs operating in low-income areas to serve meals and snacks to children 18 and under after school, on weekends, and during school holidays.

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  • Fact Sheet

    The Summer Nutrition Programs can fill the hunger gap that exists during summer break for millions of low-income children in rural communities. Pairing summer meals with summer programs addresses the loss in learning that too many low-income children experience over the summer months.

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  • Fact Sheet

    At the end of the community eligibility four-year cycle, school districts must reestablish their identified student percentage (ISP) to continue operating community eligibility. Those that no longer meet the 40 percent-eligibility threshold, but have an ISP of at least 30 percent, can continue to operate community eligibility for an additional year, called the “grace year.”

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  • Fact Sheet

    The School Breakfast Program ensures 12.1 million low-income students across the country start their school day ready to learn. School breakfast is particularly important for low-income students in rural communities who are more likely than their peers in metropolitan areas to live in food-insecure households, and, who often face additional barriers to accessing the program.

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