Search & Filter

Switch View
  • Toolkit

    According to our new report, Afterschool Suppers: A Snapshot of Participation, on an average day in October 2018, the Afterschool Nutrition Programs provided suppers to 1.3 million children (a 10.4 percent increase from October 2017) and snacks to 1.5 million children. 

    FRAC has developed a communications toolkit to help you spread the word about the promising growth in afterschool nutrition participation — alongside strategies for making even more progress. The toolkit includes our new report, our national news release, a sample news release, sample social media, and graphics.

    Read the report
  • Report

    FRAC’s report on participation data in the Afterschool Nutrition Programs measures how many children had access to afterschool suppers and snacks in October 2018, nationally and in each state. The Afterschool Supper Program served 1.3 million children on an average weekday in October 2018, an increase of 10.4 percent, or 126,393 children, from October 2017.

    Read the report
  • Report

    Increasing participation in the Afterschool Meal Program requires proactive planning and partnership. Developing a strong and cohesive outreach plan is an important way to increase participation, and the summer months are the perfect time to recruit afterschool sites, ensure existing sites will be returning, engage new partners, and increase awareness. Detailed below are things to consider when developing an afterschool meals outreach plan, as well as best practices shared by Florida Impact, Children’s Hunger Alliance, and the City of Seattle.

    Read the report
  • Report

    FRAC’s report on participation data in the Afterschool Nutrition Programs measures how many children had access to afterschool suppers and snacks in October 2017, nationally and in each state. 1.2 million low-income children benefited from afterschool suppers in October 2017, an 11.3 percent increase from the previous year.

    Read the report
  • Interactive Data Tool

    This interactive map highlights participation in the Afterschool Supper Program and Afterschool Snack Program for each state.

    Find out more
  • Fact Sheet

    Since the nationwide expansion of the Afterschool Meal Program was authorized in 2010, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, sponsors, state agencies, and anti-hunger, afterschool, and child advocates have been working to increase the number of programs and children participating. This fact sheet details promising practices that can help increase the reach of afterschool suppers.

    Read more
  • Fact Sheet

    Every day, school nutrition departments across the country provide healthy meals to children to fuel their minds and bodies. FRAC has a variety of resources to help school districts boost participation in school breakfast and lunch and implement strong afterschool and summer nutrition programs that maximize federal child nutrition funding.

    Read more
  • Fact Sheet

    The Afterschool Nutrition Programs fill the hunger gap that exists after school for millions of low-income children in rural communities. The programs, which include the Child and Adult Care Afterschool Meal Program and the National School Lunch Program Afterschool Snack Program, provide federal funding to afterschool programs operating in low-income areas to serve meals and snacks to children 18 and under after school, on weekends, and during school holidays.

    Read more
  • Archived

    An infographic stating early 1.1 million low-income children benefited from afterschool suppers in October 2016. From FRAC’s first-ever report on participation data in the Afterschool Nutrition Programs.

    Download the infographic.
  • Report

    FRAC’s first-ever report on the Afterschool Nutrition Programs measures how many children had access to afterschool suppers and snacks in October 2016, nationally and in each state.

    The report found that nearly 1.1 million low-income children benefited from afterschool suppers in October 2016, up from just 200,000 in October 2011.

    Read the report
  • Fact Sheet

    The president’s fiscal year proposed 2020 budget does not propose any direct changes to the federally funded Afterschool Meal and Snack Programs. The proposed budget does, however, zero out funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers, the largest federal funding source for operations of afterschool and summer programs.

    Read more
  • Fact Sheet

    The Education for Homeless Children and Youths (EHCY) program, authorized under Title VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (McKinney-Vento Act), was created to ensure homeless students have educational rights and protections. State Education Agencies (SEA) and Local Education Agencies (LEA) must review and revise their current policies and procedures to safeguard homeless students’ access to high-quality education as part of drafting their Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plans.

    Read more
  • Fact Sheet

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued rules updating the nutrition standards for meals served through CACFP. This resource is meant to be a roadmap for sites to understand and plan for the new meal pattern and identify nutrition enrichment activities to empower families, support staff, and engage children.

    Read more
  • Best Practice

    Umbrella sponsors may be local government agencies, school districts, food banks, youth-serving organizations, and other private nonprofits. They fill a critical need by overseeing multiple, and often smaller, afterschool enrichment sites that need administrative support to participate in the Afterschool Meal Program.

    Read more
  • Best Practice

    Advocates can expand the Afterschool Meal Program and obtain federal reimbursement using proven outreach strategies, including promoting the program, building relationships with afterschool and out-of-school time provider networks, connecting sites to available community resources, and working closely with the state agency.

    Read more