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  • Best Practice

    State agencies should adopt processes to allow for telephonic signatures for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) applications and recertifications for use by state agency staff and third-party partners, such as community-based organizations that are contracted to help clients apply or recertify for SNAP.

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  • Best Practice

    Work with the state agency to create a standard medical deduction (SMD) to simplify the collection of medical expense information from Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants who are elderly (60+) or are non-elderly and living with disabilities. Doing so requires the state SNAP agency to request a demonstration waiver — from U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service (USDA-FNS) — to develop an SMD in lieu of calculating actual medical expenses.

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  • Best Practice

    State agencies and their community nonprofit and local government partners can receive matching federal funds to create and implement Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) outreach and application assistance plans. The federal funds cover up to 50 percent of the cost of approved activities. State SNAP agencies must submit plans for U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service’s (USDA-FNS) approval.

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  • Best Practice

    Stakeholders can work with the state SNAP agency to ensure that eligible older adults (age 60 and older) and people with disabilities can deduct from income all allowable unreimbursed medical expenses when calculating Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Advocates should educate older adults and people with disabilities — and the families and organizations that support them — about allowable medical expense deductions that can result in a more adequate and accurate SNAP benefit that reflects the real value of out-of-pocket medical expenses.

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  • Best Practice

    States can request a SNAP waiver from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to implement the Elderly Simplified Application Project (ESAP) for households with seniors and/or people with disabilities that have no earned income. ESAP allows states to streamline the application and recertification process, helping more seniors (age 60 and older) and people with disabilities benefit from SNAP.

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  • Best Practice

    Unemployed or underemployed adults without dependents and without other exemptions (such as disability) often face time limits after three months of receiving benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). In this best practice, learn how partnering with health professionals, advocates, application assistance providers, and others can help individuals who are struggling against hunger to continue to receive benefits from SNAP when they might otherwise be improperly subjected to three-month time limits as so-called “Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents” (ABAWD).

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  • Best Practice

    Many school districts and a number of state policies include providing a reimbursable school lunch to students regardless of their ability to pay. These districts can take important steps to reduce or eliminate the school meal debt that this approach can incur. Strategies include offering school breakfast, school lunch or breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students when it is financially viable; taking steps to ensure that all students who are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals are certified to receive them; implementing USDA policies that can help reduce school meal debt; and responding quickly when students begin to accrue debt.

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  • Best Practice

    School meals programs provide children with the opportunity to receive the nutrition they need throughout the school day. Many households participate in school meals programs to ensure that their children are fed when they are away from home. There are various instances, however, when a household that is not certified for free or reduced-price school meals may not be able to pay for school meals. Reasons for the lack of money on the school lunch account can vary from a change in household income status, a misunderstanding of school meal procedures, or simply forgetting to refill the account. When this occurs, school districts should ensure that communication about the debt is held with the households and not the students. There are several effective strategies for outreach and engagement with households that have school meal debt.

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  • Best Practice

    Best practices from the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in states across the country, from West Virginia to California.

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  • Best Practice

    If your state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program calculates gross income based on a four-week month, ensure that Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits are calculated the same way.

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  • Best Practice

    Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) distribution sites can partner with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) outreach providers and anti-hunger advocates to help CSFP beneficiaries enroll in SNAP.

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  • Best Practice

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) can be tapped to help individuals and communities recover from natural or man-made disasters. Advocates can work with federal and state partners to get temporary Disaster SNAP (D-SNAP) benefits to households not already participating in SNAP, and replacement and supplemental SNAP benefits to current SNAP participants adversely affected by disaster.

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  • Best Practice

    Advocates and state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) agencies can improve access to SNAP for people with disabilities by disseminating accurate information about the program, opting for program practices that best serve people with disabilities, and partnering with people with disabilities and the organizations that support them.

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  • Best Practice

    Umbrella sponsors may be local government agencies, school districts, food banks, youth-serving organizations, and other private nonprofits. They fill a critical need by overseeing multiple, and often smaller, afterschool enrichment sites that need administrative support to participate in the Afterschool Meal Program.

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  • Best Practice

    Advocates can expand the Afterschool Meal Program and obtain federal reimbursement using proven outreach strategies, including promoting the program, building relationships with afterschool and out-of-school time provider networks, connecting sites to available community resources, and working closely with the state agency.

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