Topic: Child Nutrition

Last Day to Comment on a Proposed Rule That Jeopardizes School Meals Access for More Than 500,000 Children

Senior Researcher, Nutrition Policy & Community Health

On July 24, the administration proposed a rule that would take away Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits from over 3 million people and jeopardize more than 500,000 children’s access to free school meals. The move is bad policy, as it threatens to make children hungrier at home and at school, and reduces access to the good nutrition provided by school meals that support child health, learning, and well-being.

New FRAC Report Elevates Community Eligibility as a Key to Hunger-Free Schools

Child Nutrition Policy Analyst

Participation in community eligibility — a powerful tool for high-need schools to offer breakfast and lunch at no cost to all students while eliminating the need for families to fill out school meal applications — is growing across the nation, according to a new FRAC report released this month. Community Eligibility: The Key to Hunger-Free Schools, School Year 2018–2019 shows that nearly 13.6 million children in nearly 28,500 schools across the country (64 percent of all eligible schools) are using the provision in the 2018–2019 school year.

Experts Share Key Data on WIC’s Importance and Strategies for Boosting Participation

Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellow

FRAC offered a look at the report during a webinar on May 6. The webinar featured Jamie Bussel, M.P.H, Senior Program Officer for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Lanre Falusi, MD, FAAP, Pediatrician for Children’s National Health System and former President of the D.C. Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics; Ginger Farineau, Nutrition Initiatives Manager of Hunger Free Vermont; Geri Henchy, FRAC’s Director of Nutrition Policy and Early Childhood Programs; Jim Weill, FRAC’s President; and Beverley Wheeler, Director of D.C. Hunger Solutions.

The President’s Groundhog Day Budget is Familiar and Devastating for Low-Income People

FRAC President

The President’s Groundhog Day Budget came out later than it is due to Congress, and after Groundhog Day, but is no less Groundhog-ish because it was late. Like Phil Connors (aka Bill Murray) in the film Groundhog Day, the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2020 budget is caught in a loop, repeating many of the worst ideas from past years when it comes to public policy for low-income Americans.