2018 Farm Bill letter to House and Senate Budget and Appropriations Committees
FRAC is proud to have played a leadership role in developing support for this letter (pdf) urging the House and Senate Budget and Appropriations Committees not to “hinder development and passage of the 2018 Farm Bill with further cuts.”

SNAP Support Letters & Resolutions

Advocacy efforts at the state and local level have been critically important in strengthening and safeguarding federal food and nutrition programs.  Below are examples of past efforts to help you in developing messages to champion these programs.

State and Local Letters
City of Oakland letter to Farm Bill conferees expressing support to SNAP. (2013)
County of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors letter to Chairwoman Stabenow opposing SNAP cuts and describing the possible outcomes of the House proposals. (2013)
County Welfare Directors Association of California letter to all Farm Bill conferees opposing SNAP cuts and outlining how specific proposals would harm groups within California. (2013)
Letter from 19 mayors outlining the importance of SNAP for their constituents and local businesses. (2014)
Michigan organizations letter to Senator Stabenow outlining the importance of SNAP for the state of Michigan and its residents. (2013)
Minnesota Food Share (an inter-faith group) letter to Senator Franken supporting SNAP and the often vulnerable groups of people that use the program. (2012)
Ohio Grocers Association letter to their Congresswoman Fudge about the importance of SNAP to both program participants and the businesses they buy their food from. (2012)

City Council Resolutions
Los Angeles City Council resolution in support of SNAP. (2012)
New York City Council resolution in support of SNAP. (2013)
Oakland, CA city council resolution opposing changes in SNAP. (2013)

Farm Bill 2018

Conversations around the 2018 Farm Bill are expected to begin in 2017 with the 115th Congress. Read our Farm Bill Primer for more information on the Farm Bill.

Previous SNAP Legislation (114th Congress, 2015-2016)

  • Closing the Meal Gap Act of 2016
    H.R.5215 – Introduced May 12, 2016 by Representative Alma Adams (D-NC) and eight original co-sponsors.    

    What it does: Authorizes a SNAP Standard Excess Medical Deduction for persons who are elderly or have disabilities (with a minimum standard of $140); replaces the Thrifty Food Plan with the Low-Cost Food Plan as the basis for SNAP benefits; eliminates the cap on the SNAP Excess Shelter Deduction; raises the minimum SNAP benefit from $16 to $25 per month; and exempts jobless adults from SNAP time limits if the state does not provide them with a SNAP Employment and Training (SNAP E & T) slot. See the co-sponsors.

  • SNAP Work Opportunities and Veteran Protection Act of 2015
    S. 2420 – Introduced December 17, 2015 by Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT).

    What it does: Preserves access to SNAP benefits for certain jobless able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) who are seeking work but who are not selected for a state job training or workfare program. Also exempts from time limits on their SNAP benefits military veterans who participate in a Veterans Affairs or State rehabilitation or employment program. See the co-sponsors.

  • SNAP Work Opportunities Act of 2015
    H.R. 1025 – Introduced February 24, 2015 by Representative Jim McDermott (D-WA).

    What it does: Preserves access to SNAP benefits for certain jobless able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) by exempting them from time limits on their SNAP benefits if they are not selected for a state job training or workfare program. See the co-sponsors.

  • Food Security Improvement Act of 2015
     H.R. 3657 – Introduced September 30, 2015 by Representative Theodore E. Deutch (D-FL).

    What it does: Improves SNAP by requiring benefits to be calculated using the government’s Low-Cost Food Plan instead of the Thrifty Food Plan. See the co-sponsors.