Farm Bill Implementation

Now that the latest version of the Farm Bill is officially re-authorized, the next step is to ensure its full implementation. Check out these resources.

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Rep. Alma Adams (D-NC) Introduces Bill to Increase SNAP Benefits

H.R. 1368, which has 106 cosponsors, would increase benefits for all SNAP participants by basing benefits on the Low Cost Meal Plan instead of the Thrifty Food Plan, increase SNAP benefits for families with children with high shelter costs by removing the cap on the SNAP shelter deduction, raise the SNAP monthly minimum benefit to $25, and authorize a SNAP Standard Excess Medical Deduction for persons who are elderly or have disabilities (with a minimum standard of $140).

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USDA’s Proposed SNAP Rule Will Arbitrarily Limit States’ Ability to Provide Benefits, Increasing Hunger and Poverty

The Trump Administration’s proposed Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) rule would diminish food assistance for unemployed and underemployed people in areas with insufficient jobs; undo long-settled regulations; cynically attempt to end run Congress; and increase hunger and nutrition-related diseases.

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President Signs Farm Bill

President Trump signed the Farm Bill into law on December 20. Read FRAC’s analysis. The final Farm Bill conference report was filed the evening of Monday, December 10 — check out FRAC’s statement. On December 11, the Senate passed the conference report, 87-13. The House passed the bill on December 12 by a vote of 369-47.

Read FRAC's analysis

Farm Bill On the Hill:

Webcast of first public Farm Bill Conference public meeting (September 5, 2018).

2018 Farm Bill Conferees and their twitter handles.

2018 Farm Bill Conference – Letters in Support of SNAP.

Sign up for FRAC’s Action Alerts to get the most up-to-date information on ways you can help protect and strengthen SNAP in the Farm Bill.

About the 2018 Farm Bill:

The 2018 Farm Bill, signed into law on December 20, 2018, is a comprehensive piece of legislation that authorizes most federal policies governing food and agriculture programs, including SNAP – the nation’s most critical anti-hunger program.

FRAC’s 2018 Farm Bill Resource Toolkit includes FRAC’s statements and analyses of the bills, links to the committees’ text and resources, SNAP support letters from advocates across the country, a Farm Bill Primer, and interactive mapping tools to find SNAP data for your state and community.

SNAP Support Letters – 115th Congress (pdf)

Previous SNAP Support Letters & Resolutions – Before 115th Congress (pdf)

Advocacy efforts at the state and local level have been critically important in strengthening and safeguarding federal food and nutrition programs. These are examples of past efforts to help you in developing messages to champion these programs.

Current SNAP Legislation (116th Congress, 2019-2020)

  • H.R.1368 - Closing the Meal Gap Act of 2019
    H.R.1368 — Introduced February 26, 2019 by Representative Alma Adams (D-NC) and 104 original co-sponsors.

    What it does: Increases benefits for all SNAP participants by basing benefits on the Low Cost Meal Plan instead of the Thrifty Food Plan; increases SNAP benefits for families with children with high shelter costs by removing the cap on the SNAP shelter deduction; raises the SNAP monthly minimum benefit to $25; removes additional SNAP eligibility requirements for full- and part-time students enrolled in an institution of higher education and students responsible for the care of disabled members of households; and authorizes a SNAP Standard Excess Medical Deduction for persons who are elderly or have disabilities (with a minimum standard of $140). See the co-sponsors.

Previous SNAP Legislation (115th Congress, 2017-2018)

  • SNAP for Kids Act of 2018
    S. 2723 — Introduced April 18, 2018 by Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and four original co-sponsors.

    What it does: Changes the SNAP benefits formula for children ages 5-17 years old by basing allotments on the “Low Cost” rather than the “Thrifty” Food Plan; and regularly updates the SNAP formula to ensure that the benefit will not fall behind as food costs rise. See the co-sponsors.

  • Closing the Meal Gap Act of 2017
    H.R. 1276 – Introduced March 1, 2017 by Representative Alma Adams (D-NC) and 30 original co-sponsors.

    What it does: Increases SNAP benefit adequacy by: replacing the Thrifty Food Plan with the Low-Cost Food Plan as the basis for SNAP benefits; eliminating the cap on the SNAP Excess Shelter Deduction; raising the minimum SNAP benefit from $16 to $25 per month; and authorizing a SNAP Standard Excess Medical Deduction for persons who are elderly or have disabilities (with a minimum standard of $140). Also protects certain jobless adults who are willing to work from being time limited out of SNAP if the state does not offer them SNAP Employment and Training (E& T) positions. See the co-sponsors.

Previous SNAP Legislation (114th Congress, 2015-2016)

  • Closing the Meal Gap Act of 2016
    H.R.5215 – Introduced May 12, 2016 by Representative Alma Adams (D-NC) and eight original co-sponsors.    

    What it does: Authorizes a SNAP Standard Excess Medical Deduction for persons who are elderly or have disabilities (with a minimum standard of $140); replaces the Thrifty Food Plan with the Low-Cost Food Plan as the basis for SNAP benefits; eliminates the cap on the SNAP Excess Shelter Deduction; raises the minimum SNAP benefit from $16 to $25 per month; and exempts jobless adults from SNAP time limits if the state does not provide them with a SNAP Employment and Training (SNAP E & T) slot. See the co-sponsors.

  • SNAP Work Opportunities and Veteran Protection Act of 2015
    S. 2420 – Introduced December 17, 2015 by Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT).

    What it does: Preserves access to SNAP benefits for certain jobless able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) who are seeking work but who are not selected for a state job training or workfare program. Also exempts from time limits on their SNAP benefits military veterans who participate in a Veterans Affairs or State rehabilitation or employment program. See the co-sponsors.

  • SNAP Work Opportunities Act of 2015
    H.R. 1025 – Introduced February 24, 2015 by Representative Jim McDermott (D-WA).

    What it does: Preserves access to SNAP benefits for certain jobless able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) by exempting them from time limits on their SNAP benefits if they are not selected for a state job training or workfare program. See the co-sponsors.

  • Food Security Improvement Act of 2015
     H.R. 3657 – Introduced September 30, 2015 by Representative Theodore E. Deutch (D-FL).

    What it does: Improves SNAP by requiring benefits to be calculated using the government’s Low-Cost Food Plan instead of the Thrifty Food Plan. See the co-sponsors.